Frequently asked questions

  • Q: What is Sustainability?

    A: Sustainability is the “reframing” of the debate over human-environment relationship critical to ensuring quality of life for future generations – whether the human life-support system on earth can continue indefinitely, or whether it is changing the world in radical ways that will lead to new, undesirable states for people and the planet. The debate has evolved from past polarizing conversations of either development or environment to discussions of how humankind can transform its economic growth system into a sustainable approach that does not threaten earth’s life supporting systems.

  • Q: What makes the School of Sustainability undergraduate programs different from other disciplinary-based undergraduate programs?

    A: The School’s programs are problem-based rather than disciplined-based and students with different interests, skills, and backgrounds get to learn and work together to solve real-world problems. Students will be exposed to different ways of thinking in our programs and will also have the opportunity to help shape the new, groundbreaking field as it evolves.

    We also work very closely with the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability . The Institute is involved in many collaborative research projects and hosts many top scholars and professionals working in the field of sustainability. As far as the curriculum is concerned, our program equips students with comprehensive knowledge of what is going on in the field of sustainability at local, national, and global levels. Our program also allows for students to focus in on a particular area of study to gain depth in that area through coursework and an applied experience.

  • Q: Are the School of Sustainability undergraduate programs accredited?

    A: ASU is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, which is a commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. However, accreditation by a national body or board that oversees academic degree programs in Sustainability does not currently exist. In fact, formal education in Sustainability is so new that we are one of the first schools in the nation to offer graduate and undergraduate degrees in Sustainability. It is possible that an accreditation process for programs in Sustainability will be developed in the future, but one does not exist at this time.

  • Q: What is the difference between the Bachelor of Arts in Sustainability and the Bachelor of Science in Sustainability?

    A: There are three distinct differences between the two degree programs:

    1. the tracks that students are able to pursue within each of the degree programs
    2. the math requirement
    3. the second language requirement
  • Q: How do I apply to ASU?

    A: The School of Sustainability uses ASU’s universal application process for undergraduate applications. For more information, please visit ASU’s Undergraduate Admissions site.

  • Q: When should I apply for admission as an undergraduate? Is there a deadline?

    For information on when you should apply, please visit these links for application timelines based on your student status:

  • Q: What are the application requirements for the undergraduate programs?

    A: The School of Sustainability has higher admission requirements. Applicants must select a second choice for their major on the application. Students who are not admitted to the School of Sustainability and who did not select a second major or are not admissible to the second major choice will be admitted to the exploratory social and behavioral sciences program within University College. Students with more than 45 transfer hours who are not admissible to University College will be contacted to select an appropriate major.

    Freshman applicants must meet the following standards:

    1. Have a minimum high school ABOR GPA of 3.30; AND
      • A high school class rank in the top 15 percent of class; OR
      • An SAT combined score of 1140 or higher; OR
      • An ACT combined score of 25 or higher.
    2. No high school math competency deficiency.

    Transfer students (with 12 or more transfer hours after high school graduation) are required to have a cumulative transfer GPA of 3.30 or higher.

    ASU students who would like to change their major to sustainability are required to have a cumulative ASU GPA of 3.30 or higher (based on at least 12 credit hours).

  • Q: Can I pursue an undergraduate degree in Sustainability concurrently with another undergraduate degree?

    A: More than one baccalaureate degree may be pursued concurrently if prior approval is given by the standards committee(s) of the college(s)/school(s) offering the degrees. Students may receive concurrent degrees if they meet the minimum requirements for both degrees. Students will need to talk with their advisor about this.

  • Q: I already have a baccalaureate degree. Can I pursue an undergraduate degree in Sustainability?

    A: The student seeking a second baccalaureate degree must meet admission criteria. After conferral of the first degree, a minimum of 30 semester hours in resident credit courses at ASU must be successfully completed to earn the second baccalaureate degree. The student must meet all degree and university requirements of the second degree.

  • Q: How much does it cost to complete an undergraduate program?

    A: The full cost of completing an undergraduate degree at ASU will depend on several factors:

    • The student’s residency status (Arizona or Non-Arizona resident)
    • Whether the student receives an offer of financial support from the School
    • How many credit hours a student takes each semester
    • How long the student takes to complete the program
    • Any new state-mandated tuition increases while the student is in the program.

    See current ASU tuition rates and fees .

  • Q: How do I establish Arizona residency?

    A: For information on how to establish Arizona residency, please visit Residency Classification .

  • Q: What types of careers will be available to students with an undergraduate degree in Sustainability?

    A: Sustainability graduates are prepared for admission into strong graduate and professional schools or may assume positions in higher education, industry, consultancy, utilities, regulatory agencies, non-profits, non-governmental organizations, or local, state or federal government. Recent interest in sustainability within business and government has created new employment opportunities in the field.

    By engaging a breadth of knowledge and experience, and by acquiring the skills to integrate various domains of knowledge, sustainability students prepare themselves for a variety of careers to help find solutions to challenges having to do with biodiversity and habitats, climate, social transformations, energy, materials and technology, governance and policy, international development, urbanization, and water. Learn more about careers in sustainability by visiting our careers section.

  • Q: Are there any programs, activities, or student groups at ASU that I can get involved with that are related to Sustainability?

    A: There are several student groups involved in sustainability efforts and initiatives on campus. We encourage you to contact these groups and get involved in making a difference right here at ASU. Learn more about student initiatives in sustainability by visiting our student experience section.

  • Q: What makes the School of Sustainability graduate programs different from other disciplinary-based graduate programs?

    A: The School’s programs are problem-based rather than disciplined-based and students with different interests, skills, and disciplinary backgrounds get to learn and work together to solve real-world problems. Students will be exposed to different ways of thinking in our programs and will also have the opportunity to help shape the new, groundbreaking field as it evolves. We also work very closely with the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability . The Institute is involved in collaborative research projects and hosts top scholars and professionals working in the field of sustainability. As far as the curriculum is concerned, our program equips students with comprehensive knowledge of current issues in the field of sustainability at local, national, and global levels and provides them with quantitative skill sets and exposure to different research methodologies. Our program also allows each student to focus on a particular area of study to gain depth in that area through coursework and research.

  • Q: Are the School of Sustainability graduate programs accredited?

    A: ASU is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, which is a commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. However, accreditation by a national body or board that oversees academic degree programs in Sustainability does not currently exist. In fact, formal education in Sustainability is so new that we are one of the first schools in the nation to offer graduate and undergraduate degrees in Sustainability. It is possible that an accreditation process for programs in Sustainability will be developed in the future, but one does not exist at this time.

  • Q: What is the difference between the Master of Arts in Sustainability and the Master of Science in Sustainability?

    A: The Master of Arts in Sustainability is best suited to students inclined towards social sciences, planning, and related fields. The Master of Science in Sustainability is best suited to those inclined towards natural sciences or engineering. The core courses are the same for both programs, but the student’s background experience, area of study being pursued, and/or electives may help determine which program is more appropriate.

  • Q: Do I have to finish the program within a certain number of years? How long will it take me to finish the program?

    A: There are time limits enforced by the Graduate College for each program, so please refer to the ASU Catalog . Time-to-degree varies, but the typical time-to-degree for a Master’s program is two years. Typical time-to-degree for the doctoral program is two to four years for students entering with a master’s degree and four to six years for students entering with a bachelor’s degree.

  • Q: Do you have any online or distance-learning degree programs in Sustainability?

    A: Currently we offer both undergraduate degrees, a Minor in Sustainability and a Masters of Sustainability Leadership degree online. We also offer an Executive Masters of Sustainability Leadership degree which is a hybrid in person and online degree. In addition to our undergraduate and graduate degrees we offer a wide variety of professional certificates and training online. To learn more visit our online and hybrid degrees page.

  • Q: Can I attend a graduate program part-time?

    A: Yes, you may attend part-time. Please keep in mind that your time-to-degree will be extended and that we expect that students in our programs will finish their degrees in a timely manner.

  • Q: Can I take graduate courses in Sustainability without applying to one of the programs?

    A: Students wishing to take graduate courses at ASU without applying to a program may do so by applying to the ASU Graduate College as a non-degree student. Please note that taking courses before admission into a program does not guarantee admission into a graduate program at ASU and does not guarantee that the courses taken while in non-degree status can be transferred into a degree program at ASU. Note that the Graduate College has very specific policies on the amount of non-degree hours that can potentially be brought into a graduate program. Please refer to the ASU Catalog for specific policies. Please also note that most graduate courses in Sustainability are restricted to allow our current students priority registration. Some courses may be opened up to registration outside of our program approximately one month prior the start of the semester, depending on availability.

  • Q: What is the application deadline for the graduate programs?

    A: For fall admission, applications must be received by December 15th of the preceding year. Application process details can be found here. The School only admits students for a fall start and does not admit students in the spring.

  • Q: How long will it take to receive my admission decision after I submit my application?

    A: Application review begins after all application materials are received and immediately after the application deadline. Decisions will usually be sent out starting in February, but not all applicants will receive a response at that time. Some applicants may not receive a decision on their application until May.

  • Q: Can I check the status of my application?

    A: Yes, you can check the status of your application by logging into My ASU with the ASURITE ID and password you received in the Application Acknowledgement letter from the Graduate College. Under the section titled “My Programs & Advising” click on the link titled “View Your Admissions Application Status.” You may also check the status of your application by sending an email to schoolofsustainability@asu.edu.

  • Q: Can international students apply for the degree programs in Sustainability?

    A: Yes, we accept applications from international students. Please visit the Graduate College website for information on additional requirements for international students.

  • Q: Are you looking for students with certain undergraduate degrees? Will I need to fulfill certain prerequisites before I apply to the program or after I am accepted into the program?

    A: We currently do not require a specific undergraduate degree or major to apply to our graduate program. We encourage applications from individuals with diverse educational backgrounds and experience that are relevant to the School’s core goals and challenge areas. No prerequisites have been established at this time; however, if applicable, deficiencies for each applicant may be determined at time of admission.

  • Q: Is it competitive to get into a graduate program in Sustainability?

    A: Yes, admission is competitive because there is a strong interest in our graduate programs and we usually receive a large number of applications. Although we do look at each individual applicant’s qualifications, we also base our admissions decisions on creating a cohort of students with diverse educational backgrounds and experiences.

    Application process details can be found here. You can also view our 2010-2011 Graduate Student Profile to get sense of who has been admitted into the graduate programs in the past.

  • Q: What makes a competitive application to the graduate program in Sustainability?

    A: There are several ways applicants can make their applications competitive:

    • Make sure that all application materials have been received by the Graduate College by the application deadline.
    • Maintain a strong undergraduate and graduate (if applicable) GPA – it should be at least a 3.25 on a 4.0 scale, but preferably higher.
    • Earn strong scores on the GRE. The most competitive candidates will have scores in the 70th percentile or higher in all three test areas (quantitative, analytical, and verbal).
    • Obtain strong academic letters of recommendation from faculty speaking to your ability to do graduate work. While we do accept professional letters, strong recommendations from professors will help your application.
    • Write a clear and focused statement of intent and include the criteria listed in the application procedures. It is especially important to identify potential faculty advisors and areas of research/study in your application.
  • Q: Do you require recommendations? Is there a format for recommendation?

    A: Three recommendations are required. Applicants will be asked to provide contact information for their recommenders through the online application and will be asked whether or not they would like to waive the right to view the recommendations submitted. Upon completion and submission of the application, the recommendation form and instructions will automatically be sent to the recommender and they will be asked to submit their recommendations online. References should be from educators (preferred) or professionals familiar with the applicant’s experience and capability for graduate work. It is highly recommended that the recommendations are academic in nature and address the applicant’s experience and potential for success in a graduate program; however, we will also accept professional recommendations. If possible, at least one recommendation should be academic in nature. Applicants will be able to check the status of their recommendations online at My ASU .

    Applicants will be rated on their writing ability, formal-speaking ability, reasoning and analysis, mathematics and statistics, and overall intellectual ability. Recommenders are asked to describe how they know the applicant and provide their opinion on the quality of the applicant’s academic achievements, intellectual ability and capability to complete advanced work in a graduate program; aspects of the applicant’s personality and character significant to graduate work; and special skills and experience as demonstrated in a vocation or profession.

  • Q: Should I submit a resume/CV with my application?

    A: A resume or CV is not required, but we highly recommend submitting one as part of your application to highlight your accomplishments as well as your educational background and professional experience. A resume or CV is also a good way to highlight special skills, affiliations, and experiences that aren’t evident in other parts of your application.

  • Q: Is the GRE required?

    A: We will accept GMAT scores in place of GRE scores.

  • Q: Can I substitute the GMAT for the GRE requirement?

    A: Applicants must submit a separate online application for each program they are interested in applying for. If admitted to more than one program, applicants will be required by the Graduate College to select one program; or, applicants can receive approval from each academic unit to pursue two degrees concurrently. Note that there are specific Graduate College policies on if/how credit hours can be shared between two programs. The School of Sustainability does not currently have any officially established dual or concurrent degree programs.

  • Q: How much does it cost to complete a graduate program?

    A: The full cost of completing a graduate degree at ASU will depend on several factors:

    • The student’s residency status (Arizona or Non-Arizona resident)
    • Whether the student receives an offer of financial support from the School
    • How many credit hours a student takes each semester
    • How long the student takes to complete the program
    • Any new state-mandated tuition increases while the student is in the program.

    See current ASU tuition rates and fees . For on-line course tuition information, please go to the ASU Online.

  • Q: Do all of your graduate students receive financial support?

    A: No. We only have a limited number of Fellowships and Research/Teaching Assistantships available,for which we automatically consider applicants. We strongly encourage students to seek funding from outside sources as well.

  • Q: How are Teaching Assistantship (TA) and Research Assistantship (RA) positions awarded?

    A: The School of Sustainability awards teaching assistantships and helps match candidates with research assistantships available through faculty members. Students admitted to our graduate programs who do not receive an offer of financial support from the School may seek and accept a TA or RA position within another academic unit at ASU.

  • Q: What types of careers will be available to students with a Master’s or Doctorate in Sustainability?

    A: Sustainability graduates are prepared for admission into strong graduate and professional schools or may assume positions in higher education, industry, consultancy, utilities, regulatory agencies, non-profits, non-governmental organizations, or local, state or federal government. Recent interest in sustainability within business and government has created new employment opportunities in the field. By engaging a breadth of knowledge and experience, and by acquiring the skills to integrate various domains of knowledge, sustainability students prepare themselves for a variety of careers focused on finding solutions to challenges dealing with biodiversity and habitats, climate, social transformations, energy, materials and technology, governance and policy, international development, urbanization, and water. Learn more about careers in sustainability by visiting our careers section.

    Return to top

    How to apply for the EMSL in Sustainability

    How to Apply For the PhD, MA, or MS in Sustainability

    How to Apply For the MSUS in Sustainability

  • Q: Are there any programs, activities, or student groups at ASU that I can get involved with that are related to Sustainability?

    A: There are several student groups involved in sustainability efforts and initiatives on campus. We encourage you to contact these groups and get involved in making a difference right here at ASU. Learn more about student initiatives in sustainability by visiting our student experience section.

  • Q: Who can pursue the Minor in Sustainability?

    A: Any ASU student who is a declared major and is not majoring in the following programs:

    • BA degree in the W. P. Carey School of Business with a Concentration in Sustainability
    • BS degree in Tourism and Management with a Concentration in Sustainable Tourism
    • BSE degree in Civil Engineering with a Concentration in Sustainable Engineering
    • BS degree in Public Service and Public Policy with a Concentration in Sustainability
    • BIS degree in Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Sustainability

    Exploratory students will need to declare a major before they are eligible to declare a minor.

  • Q: Is SOS 100 offered online?

    A: Yes, SOS 100 (Introduction to Sustainability) is offered online during Sessions A and B, every Fall, Spring, and Summer session.

  • Q: Do I need to take SOS 100 (Introduction to Sustainability) if I have already taken SOS 111/PUP 190 (Sustainable Cities) and/or SOS 110 (Sustainable World)

    A: No, either SOS 111/PUP 190 (Sustainable Cities) or SOS 110 (Sustainable World) may be used in place of SOS 100 (Introduction to Sustainability). In fact, you wouldn’t want to take SOS 100 (Introduction to Sustainability) if you have taken SOS 111/PUP 190 (Sustainable Cities) or SOS 110 (Sustainable World) already, as there would be too much replication of course material. If you have taken both courses, you can use one to fulfill SOS 100 and the other one may be used as a “theme” course if you are interested in the themes they count toward. Please consult your advisor if modifications are needed in DARS.

  • Q: What is the course SOS 300 (Advanced Concepts and Integrated Approaches in Sustainability) about?

    A: SOS 300 (Advanced Concepts and Integrated Approaches in Sustainability) builds off of the knowledge you acquire in SOS 100 as well as the theme courses. SOS 300 involves advanced concepts in sustainability, including systems thinking, complexity, nonlinearity, cascading effects, coupled natural-human systems, governance, future thinking, unintended consequences, normative concerns, transformation, power, participation, and equity.

    SOS 300 is also offered online during Sessions A and B, every semester.

  • Q: Can I use a different 300-level SOS course in place of SOS 300 (Advanced Concepts and Integrated Approaches in Sustainability)?

    A: No

  • Q: What are the prerequisites for SOS 300 (Advanced Concepts and Integrated Approaches in Sustainability)?

    A: Students must have declared the Sustainability minor before enrolling in SOS 300. In addition to declaring the minor, one must have completed SOS 100 (Introduction to Sustainability) or one of the two approved course substitutes (SOS 111/PUP 190, Sustainable Cities or SOS 110, Sustainable World) with a “C” or better as well as 6 credit hours from two Sustainability “themes”.

    Civil Engineering students with a Concentration in Sustainable Engineering and Tourism and Management students with a Concentration in Sustainable Tourism only have to have declared the Concentration in order to be able to enroll in SOS 300.

  • Q: How long does it take to complete the Minor in Sustainability?

    A: It depends on whether you have completed SOS 100 (Introduction to Sustainability) or one of the two approved course substitutes (SOS 111/PUP 190 Sustainable Cities or SOS 110 Sustainable World). If you have completed the Introductory SOS course and one Theme Course from two Theme Areas, you may be able to complete the Minor in Sustainability in one additional semester. You would need to take SOS 300 (Advanced Concepts and Integrated Approaches in Sustainability) in the spring of 2011 AND you would need to check with the advisor in your major to determine what courses you may use to satisfy upper-division electives requirements for the Minor in Sustainability.

  • Q: What if I haven’t taken any courses for the Minor in Sustainability yet?

    A: If you haven’t taken any courses for the Minor in Sustainability yet, it would be wise to plan for at least four semesters to complete the Minor.

  • Q: Will courses for the Minor in Sustainability be offered during summer sessions?

    A: Yes. SOS 100 (Introduction to Sustainability) and SOS 300 (Advanced Concepts and Integrated Approaches in Sustainability) will be offered every summer in Sessions A and B. Select theme courses as well as upper-division electives may also be offered. Please check the Class Search for the most up-to-date course schedules.

  • Q: What courses can I use to satisfy the upper-division electives for the Minor in Sustainability?

    A: Talk with your advisor in your major about this. These courses should be selected with your major advisor so that they complement your major and serve to fulfill the values and purposes behind why you want to earn the Minor in Sustainability and how you want to use the Minor in Sustainability in your professional life. Small sampling of possible electives .

  • Q: Can I take upper division SOS courses to fulfill my upper-division electives requirement for the Minor in Sustainability?

    A: Talk with your advisor in your major to see if they will approve upper-division SOS courses as your electives. If approved, for 300-level SOS courses, you will have needed to complete at least two of the following courses SOS 100, SOS 110, SOS 111/PUP 19 and SOS 300 with a grade of “C” or better to be eligible to enroll.

    For 400-level SOS courses that are open to non-majors, you will have needed to complete both SOS 110 and SOS 111/PUP 190 with a “C” or better to be eligible to enroll.

  • Q: Can I take one of the SOS Capstone courses as an upper-division elective?

    A: No. These courses are open to School of Sustainability Majors only.

  • Q: Who should I talk to if I am pursuing concurrent degrees/double majors?

    A: You should discuss the Minor in Sustainability with the advisor of your “primary” major (the first of the two degrees you decided to pursue)?

  • Q: How do I make sure the Minor in Sustainability is appearing on my degree audit (DARS)?

    A: You should ask your advisor in your major to post the Minor in Sustainability to your degree audit.

  • Q: What if my advisor doesn’t know about the new minor or know how to post the Minor in Sustainability or says he/she can’t do it?

    A: Listen to what your advisor tells you to do, and if there are futher questions fill out the form below.

  • Q: How do I know which courses students may use to satisfy the upper-division electives requirements for the Minor in Sustainability?

    A: You, as your student’s academic advisor for their major, determine which specific upper-division courses will fulfill the values and purposes for making the Minor in Sustainability complementary to your students’ careers. Ideally, such upper-division courses would come directly from the major for which you advise. If any of your administrators and/or faculty members has questions about how to handle this, please have them submit their question in the form below.

  • Q: What are the PS Names for the Minor in Sustainability?

    A: Here is a helpful document which lists the PSNames you will need for DARS.

  • Q: What if the Dean or Department/Unit Chair would like to add courses to the list of acceptable Theme Area courses?

    A: Please ask your Dean or Department/Unit Chair to contact Dr. Candice Carr Kelman, Assistant Director in the School of Sustainability, at Candice.Carr.Kelman@asu.edu for assistance with making this happen.

  • Q: What if I have questions or if I need assistance in helping a student?

    A: Use the form below to ask your question.

  • Q: Where do I find an internship?

    A: To learn about strategies and resources for finding an internship, please see Finding an Internship

  • Q: What qualifies an experience for School of Sustainability internship credit?

    The School of Sustainability Internship & Experiential Education Specialist screens each internship very carefully to make sure it fits our academic requirements. Please review the Internship Handbook for specific details on what defines an internship. In general, an experience will probably qualify as an internship if the student’s work allows him/her to participate in substantive sustainability-related activities that are carried out in a professional setting under the guidance of a mentor. In addition, the intern’s work should make a meaningful contribution to the agency, organization or company.

    If you have secured an internship through a source other than SustainabilityConnect , please contact the Internship & Experiential Education Specialist as soon as possible to begin the review process.

  • Q: Do internship courses count toward graduation requirements?

    The short answer is yes. School of Sustainability students may earn either SOS 484 or SOS 584 credit towards graduation requirements. Please refer to the Internship Handbook for detailed information on credit hours, grading and options.

    Depending on the catalog year, sustainability undergraduate students may either be required to do a capstone internship, or be allowed to pursue an internship as one of their capstone options. You should review your program’s capstone requirements and discuss them with your academic advisor if you are uncertain what your degree requires. All undergraduate students have the option of pursuing an internship for elective credit at any time.

    Graduate students in the Master’s in Sustainable Solutions degree program have the option of completing their capstone through an internship. All sustainability graduate students also have the option to pursue an internship for elective credit. Please discuss your plans ahead of time with the Graduate Academic Success Coordinator.

  • Q: Why do some School of Sustainability programs require an internship?

    Internships provide hands-on, practical experience in a professional setting. An internship allows you the opportunity to apply knowledge gained through lectures and coursework to real-life situations, all while enhancing your classroom education and preparing you for the professional world. Each semester, we receive positive feedback from students who say that their internship was an essential part of their education, and who thank us for requiring it.

  • Q: How many hours do I need to work at my internship site in order to earn credit?

    Before beginning an internship, you should commit to a certain number of hours. The minimum required for School of Sustainability credit is 135 worked hours for undergraduate students and 160 worked hours for graduate students.

  • Q: If I register for credit hours and my internship is off-campus, what am I paying for?

    There is an academic course component to the internship credit. In addition to the work you are doing at the internship site, you are completing assignments and participating in a course similar to other ASU classes. You receive a grade which counts in your GPA.

    Significant resources are devoted to internships. The Internship & Experiential Education Specialist is involved in all student internships from beginning to end. The coordinator advises students, evaluates sustainability internships, develops internship opportunities and information, reviews internship agreements, checks pre-requisites and registers students for necessary courses, and conducts site visits and evaluations. In addition, the specialist maintains contact with students and supervisors through e-mail, telephone, written reports and evaluations. When the semester comes to a close, the specialist reviews all materials submitted by students and supervisors, conducts interviews as needed and assigns grades.

  • Q: Are there any restrictions I should know about?

    We have found that students who try to complete an internship during their first semester at ASU are not as successful in their classes or the internship itself. Our internship providers also expect a certain level of sustainability knowledge, which typically comes after taking at least one semester of coursework in the sustainability program. Therefore, undergraduate students may register for internship credit only after completing SOS 110 and 111, as well as at least one semester at ASU. Graduate students may register for internship credit after completing SOS 510.

    Students planning to register for Undergraduate Capstone or MSUS Capstone will have additional pre-requisites in place. Please work with the Internship and Experiential Education Specialist to determine eligibility.

  • Q: How do I register for internship classes?

    After you have found an internship, begin the registration process by contacting the Internship & Experiential Education Specialist. You will need to complete all of the required forms with your internship supervisor and return them to the School of Sustainability in order to receive an override for either SOS 484 or SOS 584.

  • Q: Who should I contact for more information about sustainability internships?

    Make an appointment with the Internship & Experiential Education Specialist using our scheduling system .

  • Q: How can I prepare for a sustainability internship search?

    1. Reflection: To help direct your internship search, reflect on what you hope to gain from an internship, what type of setting and experience you would like, and how much time you are able to commit. Meet with the Internship & Experiential Education Specialist early to explore the types of sustainability internships and green careers that exist so you know what your options are.

    2. Resume: A resume is a tool to tell a prospective employer or internship host about yourself and your interests. The resume you use to pursue a sustainability internship should emphasize experience relevant to the type of internship you seek. Whether you are interested in urban planning, green business or international development, make sure to list all course, class project, volunteer activity and employment history information. The School of Sustainability offers students help with resumes in one-on-one appointments and workshops. ASU’s Career Services also offers excellent resources for preparing a resume: See resume information online .

    3. Credit requirements: Internships relevant to sustainability may be eligible for undergraduate- or graduate-level credit. Learn how you can earn credit for an internship.
  • Q: Where can I search for a sustainability internship?

    1. All internships that have been vetted and reviewed by the School of Sustainability are posted on SustainabilityConnect .

    2. Register for ASU’s Sun Devil Career Link . By completing this online registration, you can browse internship or job postings, upload your resume for employers to see and monitor opportunities as they are posted. Screen opportunities on Sun Devil Career Link carefully, and discuss them with the Internship & Experiential Education Specialist prior to accepting if you want to pursue them for credit.

    3. There are many other great resources (listed below) for sustainability-related internships and jobs on the local, national and international levels.

    4. Many students arrange internships independently. This may be achieved by contacting organizations where you have an interest in interning or through other connections. Before you contact a potential internship site, you should have a resume that clearly summarizes your experience. Also, read the Internship Handbook so you know what is required in order to earn credit for an internship and can explain this to a potential mentor. For more guidance on this approach, make an appointment with the Internship & Experiential Education Specialist.

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