School of Sustainability News

ASU partners with the Netherlands on new center to solve sustainability challenges

Institute Press Releases

January 22, 2013

TEMPE, Ariz. – January 22, 2013 – Arizona State University’s (ASU) Global Institute of Sustainability (GIOS) and the Municipality of Haarlemmermeer, The Netherlands, have created an innovative collaboration to solve challenges of sustainability.

The partnership and the establishment of an ASU Global Sustainability Solutions Center (GSSC) in Haarlemmermeer will serve as an international platform for engagement with organizations and people who want to live and do business in Haarlemmermeer and the region. It will bring together the diverse and powerful resources of universities, businesses, NGOs, communities, and government organizations to tackle tough sustainability problems and ultimately find solution sets.

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Faculty Spotlight: Nicole Darnall

January 22, 2013

Before joining Arizona State University, Nicole Darnall was an associate professor of management and public policy at George Mason University and an assistant professor of public administration at North Carolina State University. For almost two decades, Dr. Darnall has been examining firms’ responses to sustainability in regulatory and social settings. Her research investigates the reasons why companies follow sustainability strategies, whether these strategies improve the environment, and whether companies that improve the natural environment also derive business value. More recently, she assesses consumer demand for corporate green strategies and how this demand might be influenced through public policy or business initiatives. To find out more about Dr. Darnall, you can read her commentary on the 2012 Greendex survey findings that assert Americans are the least green and feel the least guilt about it.

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Researchers examine urban heat and human vulnerability

January 15, 2013

A transdisciplinary team of scientists is using the hot and populous Phoenix metropolitan area to explore how different segments of the region are being affected by increasingly oppressive heat.

ASU sociologist and Sustainability Scientist Sharon Harlan is a leading investigator on the project, which is designed to look at patterns in the past and present and apply them to potential climate scenarios of the future. The project is featured in the January issue of International Innovation.

“Our research in this desert metropolis examines how climate, plants and people create a dynamic and complex social-ecological system that requires careful stewardship in order to sustain vital natural resources and human health,” said Harlan.

An associate professor in ASU’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Harlan emphasizes that outreach and education are built into the project in an effort to help policymakers, as well as residents, deal with the rising challenges of urban heat.

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Origins Project Great Debate to focus on climate change

January 15, 2013

Climate change is one of the most important, and perhaps thorniest, issues confronting world leaders today. A lot is at stake. Issues in climate variability, loss of living space, extended drought, amplified weather cycles, growing season variability and even national security all link back to climate change. Sea levels are rising and last year was the hottest year on record for the United States. It’s clear that for climate change, the future is now.

The Origins Project at Arizona State University will hold a panel discussion on climate change, 7 p.m., Feb. 2, that will feature some of the world’s leading experts and policy analysts in the field, including School of Sustainability Dean Sander van der Leeuw and visiting scientist Wallace Broecker.

Tickets are now on sale for “The Great Debate: Climate Change, Surviving the Future,” which will take place in Gammage Auditorium on ASU’s Tempe campus.

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ASU, Arizona Science Center host event on future of energy

January 15, 2013

January 24, 2013
5 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Can our energy future be reliable, affordable, and low-impact? Fossil fuels come with environmental, economic, and social pitfalls, but renewable energy sources have their downsides as well. Perhaps our future will be shaped by a combination of both.

ASU and the Arizona Science Center are hosting a public event on the future of energy, from 5-8 p.m., Jan. 24, at the Arizona Science Center IMAX Theater. During this panel discussion, American Public Media reporter Eve Troeh will moderate a former Shell Oil president, a climate scientist, and an environmental filmmaker as we all contemplate and envision sustainable energy options.

This event is hosted through a partnership between Arizona Science Center and Arizona State University. Arizona State University President Michael Crow and Arizona Science Center President and CEO Chevy Humphrey will provide opening remarks.

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The Sustainability Consortium announces new board of directors

Institute Press Releases

January 8, 2013

ARIZONA, USA – January 8, 2012 – The membership of The Sustainability Consortium (TSC) has recently elected new corporate members to our Board of Directors.

During the inaugural board meeting in late January, The Consortium will welcome four new board members representing the corporate members of TSC: Charlene Wall-Warren of BASF, Karen Hamilton of Unilever, Kim Marotta of Miller Coors, and Kevin Rabinovitch of Mars whose organizations have all been members of TSC for over three years. Andrea Thomas, Senior Vice President of Sustainability at Walmart was re-elected for another term.

Kim Marotta, Director of Sustainability for MillerCoors, is responsible for driving and implementing MillerCoors’ sustainability strategy and managing MillerCoors’ responsibility initiatives.

“I am thrilled with the opportunity to collaborate with and learn from the other corporations, researchers, academics, and retailers. The Consortium pulls together some of the best minds in the business and I feel honored to be a member of the board,” said Marotta.

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ASU students to help Mesa create a town square

January 7, 2013

The Jan. 1 issue of the Arizona Republic featured a cooperative project between the City of Mesa and ASU’s School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning.

Mesa’s mayor Scott Smith envisioned a centrally located, public gathering place in the heart of the city, comparable to the town squares or plazas that exist in many other cities. When a bond election in November provided start-up funding to design the plaza, the city turned to ASU’s planning program for help.

The outcome is a spring 2013 course offering, “Place-making in Mesa,” in which graduate students will work at producing a viable concept for the town square. The course is taught by Senior Sustainability Scientist and School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning Professor David Pijawka.

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Death Valley now holds the record for world’s hottest temperature

January 7, 2013

cervenyThe New York Times reported on responses to the World Meteorological Organization’s announcement that Death Valley, Calif. now holds the record for the world’s hottest temperature.

ASU Professor and Senior Sustainability Scientist Randy Cerveny coordinated the international effort to evaluate the validity of the previously-held hottest-temperature record, which was based on a 1922 reading in El Azizia, Libya. Cerveny holds the title rapporteur of climate extremes for the World Climate Organization, and in this role brought together a team of 13 meteorologists – including experts from Libya, Italy, Spain, Egypt, France, Morocco, Argentina, the United States, and the United Kingdom – to evaluate the Libya record.

The New York Times article discusses responses to the announcement in the Death Valley community – for example, Randy Banis, the editor of an online newsletter promoting the area, stated “You don’t underestimate Death Valley.  Most of us enthusiasts are proud that the extremes that we have known about at Death Valley are indeed the most harsh on earth.”

“There are a lot of places that do like these records,” said Cerveny for the New York Times report. “It can be a source of pride for that country or a source of contention for other countries. Politics, unfortunately, are going to play a role sometime in the determining of these records.”

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DOE 2013 Solar Decathlon competitors to meet media on Friday, January 11

Institute Press Releases

January 7, 2013

ORANGE COUNTY, Calif. – Jan. 7, 2013 – Members of the media will have an opportunity to meet representatives from all 20 collegiate teams competing in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 as well as interview Richard King, Director and founder of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon.

This will be the student teams’ first visit to the Orange County Great Park as they arrive for a weekend workshop to prepare for the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition. The Great Park will host the award-winning competition October 3-13, 2013, the first time the event has ever been held outside of Washington D.C.

The Solar Decathlon challenges collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive. The winner of the competition is the team that best blends affordability, consumer appeal, and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency.

The Solar Decathlon 2013 will be the centerpiece of the XPO, a world’s fair of clean, renewable, and efficient energy.

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New directions in national energy policy: Skepticism about big initiatives

January 7, 2013

In an EnergyBiz article, reporter Tom Armistead writes that even though the current administration is aware of climate change and claims it as a focus for future policy, the United States still doesn’t have a clear-cut energy policy. What we do have is a mash-up of different policies that were developed for past political movements. Armistead writes the policies “promote both renewable energy and fossil fuels, without emphasis on either one or direction for the long term.” What kind of energy future will America have?

Some experts say the market should dictate what type of energy sources should be developed. Others still think climate change is only a minor threat. However, 2012 brought many weather extremes, causing more people to reflect on the concept of “climate change.”

In the article, Senior Sustainability Scientist Clark Miller says current energy policy is “working to increase energy supply, but also is raising public concerns about what it would mean to increase North American energy production and increasing concern about climate change.”

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Report: Climate changing watersheds

December 19, 2012

In a technical report to be included in the Third U.S. National Climate Assessment, climate scientists say temperature changes and shifts in species ranges and moisture will have major effects on natural ecosystems, especially watersheds. These effects will trickle down to human activities like commercial fishing and storm preparedness.

The report’s findings are covered in the Arizona Republic. The team of scientists come from Arizona State University, the National Wildlife Federation, and the U.S. Geological Survey. Nancy Grimm, a sustainability scientist in ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability and professor in the School of Life Sciences, served as a lead researcher on the report.

“U.S. ecosystems are undergoing massive change due to climate change,” says Grimm.

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Helping you ID which common brands are most sustainable: ASU professor helps with groundbreaking research

Institute Press Releases

December 18, 2012

Kevin_Dooley_SmalTEMPE, Ariz. – Dec. 18, 2012 – As you do your shopping this holiday season, would it help to know exactly which toys, electronics, food and other items are better for the environment? A prominent researcher at the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is helping to develop a system that will tell retailers, manufacturers, and eventually consumers, about the sustainability of many of the products we buy every day.

Professor Kevin Dooley is research director of The Sustainability Consortium, an impressive group administered by Arizona State University and the University of Arkansas, featuring big-name-members, such as Unilever, BASF, MillerCoors, Mars and Walmart, with combined revenue of more than $1.5 trillion. The consortium is developing criteria that will allow you to easily identify which products are the most sustainable in their categories, based on factors like emissions, labor practices, water usage and waste creation. The consortium’s efforts were recently named among 10 “world-changing ideas” that are “radical enough to alter our lives” by Scientific American, and this year, the consortium’s work really vaulted forward.

“We have now established the critical issues and best areas in which to improve more than 100 types of the most common products — everything from electronics and toys, to food, drinks and personal care items,” says Dooley, also a sustainability scientist in ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability. “We’re helping businesses focus on the most important sustainability issues and giving them a way to measure and share their progress in making products better. This year, we were able to make rapid progress, thanks to the intense efforts of our staff and the stakeholders involved.”

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Climate change already having major effects on ecosystems, species

December 18, 2012

A report by more than 60 federal, academic, and other scientists, including lead authors from the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Wildlife Federation, and Arizona State University, warns that climate change is having immediate negative effects on natural systems and wildlife. As the global temperature rises, the timing and geographic ranges of many innate processes animals go through, like breeding and migrating, are being shifted, causing an imbalance.

“These geographic range and timing changes are causing cascading effects that extend through ecosystems, bringing together species that haven’t previously interacted and creating mismatches between animals and their food sources,” said Nancy Grimm, a sustainability scientist at ASU and a lead author of the report.

These changes can influence survival for many species and can affect humans, too. The ecosystem services we depend on, like food, clean water, and wood products, can suddenly change and become scarce.

The report is one of many to be included in the 2013 U.S. National Climate Assessment, a federally required assessment of climate change and its impacts.

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Sustainability scientist: Why don't we measure nature's capital?

December 18, 2012

Sustainability scientist and professor Ann Kinzig says, while we do measure the bounty that nature provides, we fail to measure the intrinsic wealth that’s found in natural goods. That’s the reason why our inclusive wealth is not growing, and one of the reasons why we haven’t achieved sustainability.

“On our national accounting and indices, we track some forms of wealth but not others,” Kinzig, a professor in the School of Sustainability and School of Life Sciences, says. “And when we don’t track something, we are sending the signal that it is not important – that we don’t need to take care of it.”

Kinzig discussed natural capital and the wealth of nature at the Arizona Science Center on Oct. 26. As part of Arizona State University’s partnership with the Arizona Science Center, Kinzig was one of three prominent university researchers giving “lightning lectures,” or five minute talks about everything ranging from technology, to the environment, to health.

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Our Graduates: Kim Pearson

December 17, 2012

Growing up in Phoenix, sustainability and Spanish literature senior Kim Pearson was first introduced to the basics of sustainability through class projects on issues such as deforestation.

“I first heard the term, ‘sustainability’ when watching a documentary and I thought, ‘Now I can give a name to what I’ve been interested in all these years,’” she says.

Pearson is graduating from the School of Sustainability with an emphasis in sustainable economics because she wants to understand the economic policies behind agriculture and trade.

“I have been interested in sustainability concepts since elementary school, as I began to learn about environmental issues and their relation to human behavior, politics and economics,” Pearson says.

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Our Graduates: Tim Exposito

December 17, 2012

Tim Exposito’s interest in construction is nothing new. At 16, he helped his brother build a house. In high school, he worked at a cousin’s construction business. During his high school senior year, Exposito spent his mornings at a construction site and his afternoons in the classroom.

His passion for sustainability has always been there, too.

“I’ve always written papers about recycling, impacts and implications,” Exposito says. “Sustainability has always been a fascination of mine. It’s always been a goal of mine to reuse something instead of throwing it away. I do this in construction and everyday as much as possible.”

Now, Exposito gets to combine construction and sustainability in his career.

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Our Graduates: Braden Kay

December 17, 2012

Most five year olds may be more concerned with cartoon TV shows rather than their neighborhood community garden. But Braden Kay started his life mission early – at a local youth garden when he was just a kid.

“I grew up in Washington, D.C., and saw the challenges of providing quality services to an economically and racially segregated city,” he says. “From starting at the local youth garden at age five, I always wanted to be part of producing solutions that bring diverse people together to make their city better with opportunity for all.”

Kay says it was ASU President Michael Crow’s vision of Arizona State University as a New American University that drew him to the School of Sustainability to study urban development and sustainability challenges.

“The School of Sustainability provided me with the opportunity I was looking for – to become a world-class urban solution developer,” he says.

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Researchers: Urban heat island effect more severe than global warming

December 13, 2012

Global Institute of Sustainability’s research is profiled in a recent State Press article. State Climatologist Nancy Selover and Senior Sustainability Scientist Nalini Chhetri both warn that the urban heat island effect, especially in the Valley, may have quicker repercussions than global warming.

Since development in the Phoenix metropolin area exploded in the 1970s, the urban heat island effect has taken its toll.

“Now, because of the heat island, we are seeing nighttime temperatures in the low 90s a lot more than we used to,” Selover says.  “The record high at night is 96, and we’re hoping we don’t end up seeing it go above that.”

So what can people do? Chhetri advises implementing xeriscapes, providing shade whenever possible, and planting native trees to help mitigate the higher temperatures, which can prove fatal to the elderly, homeless, and low-income populations.

“It’s a combination of technology and lifestyle changes and disseminating knowledge, information, and awareness,” she says.  “We must not force people to make decisions or give them doomsday scenarios.”

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The Consumer Goods Forum and The Sustainability Consortium announce global partnership to harmonize sustainability measurement

Institute Press Releases

December 11, 2012

ARIZONA, USA, – December 11, 2012 – As the consumer goods industry continues to drive sustainability throughout the supply chain, there is an increasing need for a globally harmonized science-based approach to measure and communicate product life cycles. Today, a partnership between two leading global organizations was announced that will create tremendous progress in achieving this goal. The Sustainability Consortium (TSC), an independent organization of global participants developing science and integrated tools to support informed decision making for product sustainability across the consumer goods industry and The Consumer Goods Forum (CGF), a global industry network with over 400 retailers, manufacturers, service providers and other stakeholders are announcing a strategic alliance.

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Three mayors discuss meaning, importance of sustainability

December 11, 2012

The Tempe Republic covered a mayoral forum that took place on Sept. 25. In the Southeast Valley Opinion article, each mayor’s opinions and remarks are recorded regarding sustainability plans and future improvements for Mesa, Tempe, and Phoenix.

Scott Smith, the mayor of Mesa, believes sustainability is “an environmental issue, an economic issue, a planning issue.”

Mark Mitchell, the mayor of Tempe, adds that the hardest challenge in implementing urban sustainability is education.

“The biggest challenge we have is educating the policy makers, making sure we have a good plan, a mass-transit system, to make sure we have the tools to attract economic-development opportunities,” he says.

Greg Stanton, the mayor of Phoenix, advises that sustainability must be taken into consideration now and into the future.

“Push us to be better leaders,” he says. “A lot of people made a lot of money with a sprawl economy. Even when the economy comes roaring back, let’s not do things the same way.”

The mayoral forum was part of ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability’s Sustainability Series.

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mission

Established in 2006, the School of Sustainability’s mission is to educate a new generation of scholars and practitioners and create innovative modes of scholarship by bringing together leaders, stakeholders, and people from multiple disciplines to develop practical solutions to the most pressing sustainability challenges.

 

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